nature

Rock, ice, rainforest + Topophilia

Rob Blakers    Rock, ice, rainforest

Landscape photography takes us out of the studio and away from the situations that we control. It is the engagement of thought and planning, strenuous travel and intuition. It is the art of finding ourselves in places where we are drawn into subtle nature, and of seeking images that convey that experience.

This exhibition presents moments from wild landscapes in Tasmania. It comes from fine winter light on ice and mountains, elegant sand-dunes and sand-stone, and ephemeral mist in quiet forest. It is the amazing Tasmanian endemic gondwanan flora and lingering twilight over the western sea. It is a collection of encounters, mostly recent, from three decades of pursuit.

Read Rob’s opening speech below.

view images online

 

Olivia Hickey    Topophilia

Artist statement: I am an explorer of the outdoors with a deep and long held connection to the wild places. I am often drawn to the hidden details within the land and find myself captivated by the complexity and beauty in the small. I collect natural treasures mindfully, transmute them into silver and return them to place.

This process ensures that they are still part of the land and highlights the magic of the hidden details. I strive to capture the intangible moments and create talismans that connect people to the ephemeral elements of place so they can be worn on the landscape of the body.

view images online

 

 

Opening speech by Rob Blakers

Rock, Ice, Rainforest
Wild Island, February 5th 2016

“Almost half of the images on display tonight are in the direct line of the fires that continue to burn in western Tasmania.

The 100 and more fires that were lit by lightning strikes on 13th January have had a devastating impact on the Tasmanian natural landscape, and in particular on rainforest and alpine communities, which have no tolerance for fire. Fire has burnt at the edge of Australia’s largest rainforest wilderness in the Tarkine, and rolled around the western end of the Central Plateau, and at Lake Mackenzie and the February Plains, for more than 3 weeks. Trees, plants and organic soils that were upwards of a thousand years old have been killed. In a warming and drying climate this is a one-way process – those communities will not come back.

The loss of the highland Gondwanic endemics – pencil and King Billy pines, cushion plants and other alpine species, has been ongoing since white colonization of Tasmania. Less than half of the pencil pines that grew here 200 years ago now remain. Most of that loss has been caused by people, through fires that were deliberately lit and also through fires started inadvertently.

The fires of the last several weeks are different and mark the era in which we now find ourselves. We still have direct human folly, but the consequences of indirect human folly have, for the first time in history, eclipsed those. The fires that began on the 13th are not natural fires but are one terrible way in which climate change now manifests in Tasmania.

In the decade from 1993 to 2003 there were 17 wildfires ignited by lightning strikes in Tasmania. In the decade that followed there were 30. In the last month alone there have been upwards of 130. This, coupled with the driest summer ever recorded in western Tasmania, makes a critically dangerous situation. It is precisely what the climate change modeling predicted.

Pencil and King Billy pines are wonderful things; they have been my favorites since I first came to Tasmania. The highland Gondwanan landscapes are unique in Australia, and corresponding high altitude long lived trees are globally rare and diminishing. In light of these fires, however, I now see the alpine pine communities differently. I saw them before as an incredibly special and beautiful feature of the Tasmanian highlands. I still see them as that, but now see them also as fragile relicts that need our utmost protection. These plants have been around for 65 million years yet today face unprecedented threats. To lose them in the wild in coming decades, a very real prospect, would be a hideous indictment.

In their destructive spread the fires have cast a pall of smoke over Tasmania. They have also cast a pall over the collective mood of most of the people that I know – people who understand and care for wild places. It’s grief at the specific loss of ancient pines and deep rainforest, but it is more than that. For many of us this event has touched a dread that we have carried, not always consciously, for decades. It’s the understanding that humans have plundered the planet for selfish ends for a long time and that the inevitable consequences of that abuse are now in play.

Climate change has landed on our shores and today’s fires are a part of that, but plainly the crisis affects more than our beautiful pencil pines and rainforests. We are in a fight for the life of the planet.

The dread that we feel, and the events that are becoming increasingly apparent globally, can be powerful motivators. Faced with dire questions of our own survival, there has never been such incentive for positive change. To not fight is to plunge further into denial and despair. Our past cannot be our future.

We need to reduce our own impacts and help those either unable or unwilling, to also do so. We need to cultivate our vegetable plots and cultivate our resourcefulness, creativity and intuition.

Let’s hope that in a hundred years we can all look around and see the places in these pictures – flourishing groves of pencil and King Billy pine at Mt Anne, the Arthurs, and in the Walls of Jerusalem National Park, verdant rainforest in the Weld and the Northeast, (and of course in the Tarkine National Park), all being rained bountifully upon in a repairing Tasmanian climate.”

Platypus: World’s Strangest Animal – Book Launch & Exhibition

BOOK LAUNCH: Wednesday 9th December, 6 – 8pm

Join us at Wild Island Tasmania for an evening of ‘all things platypus’. We are hosting the launch one of the most comprehensive books produced to date in relation to arguably the world’s most peculiar animal.

Platypus: World’s Strangest Animal has been written, compiled, and photographed by Elizabeth Parer-Cook and David Parer, Emmy award-winning wildlife filmmakers, who previously worked with the ABC Natural History Unit for 35 years until it closed in 2008.

The book incorporates up-to-date scientific knowledge about the platypus, as well as fresh new photographs of the animal’s unique behaviour. Featured are extremely rare images of baby platypus interacting with their mother, as well as mesmerising photographs of pairs courting in the wild.

Scroll down to get a free ticket

PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION: Wednesday 9th – Wednesday 16th December

As well as launching Platypus: World’s Strangest Animal, David and Elizabeth have put together a collection of their most favourite images for exhibition purposes. The collection of photographs show detailed features and behaviours of the platypus, and all will be available to purchase.

Officially launching the book and the exhibition will be Nick Mooney, Tasmanian wildlife biologist, conservationist and educator. Nick is best known for his work in raising awareness of the threats to the Tasmanian Devil, and has worked with David and Elizabeth over the years. In 2006, Nick received the Australian of the Year – Local Hero Award.

Dawn to Dawn – Exhibition by Loic Le Guilly

Recent images of the Tasmanian natural world by Loic Le Guilly.

This exhibition is an eclectic mix of images from night and day, east and west, small and grand. Of the great expanse of wilderness forest, through to delicate traceries of colour in fluting sandstone. From shadowy Wineglass Bay in a deep night sky to the lushest of green in a deep rainforest.

“I love Tasmania. Its wild nature is a constant source of awe and serenity to me. My photography is simply to share the amazing places I get the chance to visit. I want people to care for Tasmania. I want people to realise the unique gift we have here around us. Photography still has the power to do that.”

view the images online

Morphology of Desire – Exhibition by Deborah Wace

Orchid Underworld, digital print from 6 drypoint intaglio prints

 

The cross species mirroring of form, and the lure for pollination, are the specialty of orchids; the symbiotic transfer of nutrient from fungus to root. Orchids are sensual, strange, finely attuned and  minutely adapted to their ecological niche.

Deborah Wace brings Tasmanian orchids up close and personal with large printed Intaglio Drypoint and Monoprint works, as well as botanical specimen arrangements and the display of her printmaking processes. Deborah’s passion and advocacy for wild habitat infuses her artwork and delights the senses.

 

View Entire Collection Here

Timelapse photo workshop with Francois Fourie

This workshop will be a thorough breakdown on how to shoot timelapse imagery, covering everything from composition to post production. The aim is to arm you with the knowledge and confidence to get out there and start creating your own timelapse videos.

Target audience

This workshop will benefit photographers and filmmakers, and also anyone with an interest in timelapse photography. Beginners are welcome.

Topics covered

Equipment and software solutions
Preparing for a shoot
In the field timelapse photography
Post-production

Programs used

Lightroom, Photoshop, After Effects, Premier Pro, Final Cut Pro, Quicktime Pro, LR Timelapse

 

SCROLL DOWN TO BOOK A TICKET

Hazards to Hartz – Exhibition by Barbara Tassell

Hazards to Hartz – An Accessible Journey

Exhibition by Barbara Tassell – May 2015

“My work for this exhibition is based on images taken on Tasmania’s East coast – from the Hazards on Freycinet Peninsula to the Hartz Mountains, with diversions to Mount Wellington and my home island of Bruny. These are areas I love because of their diverse colours, shapes and textures, their extensive wildlife, particularly the birds, and their accessibility to a wide range of people. Whilst not remote wilderness, each of these places can be as challenging as any when the weather breaks or you take the path less trodden.

Although based on photographs, my work strays from the photographic image into something perhaps more mysterious as I bring together fragments from many images. Whilst I would like each print to retain some of the nature of the original environment, I hope the way I have put them together might encourage people to think of the many layers that are present not only in our natural environments but in all aspects of our lives.”

view images here

Autumn Music – In celebration of Fagus

Please join us for the first in our series of Wild Island music events.

Autumn Music will celebrate Tasmania’s only deciduous tree, Nothofagus Gunnii. Although much of the palette of our native flora remains unchanged during the colder months, this small tree brings spectacular colour to the highlands in autumn.

This event has been created to provide an opportunity for young and emerging musicians to perform in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. The program for the evening is varied and will include solo cello, some classical vocal, contemporary pop, French cabaret, Swedish indie-folk and even a touch of country!

Child $10
Adult $20

SCROLL DOWN TO BOOK

Refreshments available during interval

Beauty: The Last Sinew – Exhibition by Chris Bell

“Our ability to perceive quality in Nature begins, as in art, with the pretty.  It expands through successive layers of the beautiful to values as yet uncaptured by language”

Aldo Leopold

3.-Rock-detailFor the natural world it is last call!   Every day we are closer to the point where our Earth cannot recover from our abuse. Through increasing urbanization we are becoming increasingly estranged from the natural world, un-engaged with the processes that sustain us.  Through our relentless pursuit of self-interest we have largely severed the links we once had with our living Earth.  If we cannot recover these links there is no future for humans.

My photography has always been about the beauty of the natural world and how it can uplift us. Enchant us.  Restore us. The natural world ( in particular our landscapes ) partly define who we are as a culture; without it our lives are diminished; we all lose something.  A country devoid of its natural landscapes is reduced to nothing more than soil; it is a country with an uninspiring, imprisoned future.

Despite the inroads of the modern world and our collective self-interested behavior, I believe beauty is a crucial value in itself.  In our modern dysfunctional world the capacity to perceive and convey beauty may be one of the last sinews that enables us to connect with the living world – however superficial that connection may be.  Beauty can enable us to uncover the deeper values “uncaptured by language”.  What future a world without beauty?

This exhibition showcases the more intimate aspects of the natural world that I am now pursuing.

Opening at 6pm on Friday 27 March 2015

view the images online

Refuge, exhibition by Cate Blackmore

Lux (Western Arthurs)”, acrylic media on hardboard 60 x 120cm

Refuge : exhibition of paintings by Cate Blackmore

The painted work of Cate Blackmore is raw yet intricate; wild yet subtle, abstracted yet illustrative. Refuge catches the shifting moods of a primeval and largely un-trodden Tasmanian mountain landscape. Multidimensional textured colour, the fall of light on hillside and crag and the flow of a dynamic geology evoke a place of untamed life that needs no human rationalization.

view the paintings

read the opening speech by Mark Clemens

BraveArtsmall

 

The Arthurs

The Arthurs

Opening night

After months of preparation and hard work we finally opened Wild Island ! The launch was packed and the feedback has been wonderful. Thanks for your support so far. We look forward to promoting Tasmania as the Wild Island.

Thank you to Luke O’Brien and Paul Hoelen for the photos.

Become a friend of Wild Island

Join our mailing list and stay up-to-date with our events and cool new products.

Win a print by Rob Blakers, Loic Le Guilly or Simon Olding (random draw every 3 months).

Close this popup