artist

small wonder – Gerhard Mausz and Alex Miles

Beautiful textures, colours and light, extreme and unpredictable weather, unusual and ancient plant and animal life – they all give Tasmania a unique and mystical character. This exhibition of work by Gerhard Mausz and Alex Miles is their response to Tasmania’s unique natural environment.

Alex’s bold prints and kinetic installations explore the things we feel (wonder, curiosity, anticipation, trepidation) when we’re immersed in a wild place – small figures in a big landscape. Drawn from memories of family adventures and school trips to places like Maria Island, Tasman Peninsula, Dove Lake and Mount Field, her colourful, pattern-based work is made with a young audience in mind (and the young at heart), inspiring them to get outside, embrace adventure and imagination, and discover and value Tasmania’s special places.

The fluid forms of Gerhard’s Hammerschlag Series and terrazzo sculptures reflect his fascination with Tasmania’s marine life encountered while snorkelling, surfing and camping. His natural curiousity compels him to explore. These sensual forms evolved from pushing the boundaries of his practice – using a ball hammer, each object has been hit 15000 to 27000 times to give a unique, sparkling hammer finish.

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Exhibition – Hanna Woolley and Duncan Meerding

Fibre and Light – Opening 5.30pm, Friday 3 June

Exhibition continues until Tuesday 5 July

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Hanna Woolley

Hanna mixes the age-old tradition of wet felting with a modern twist. Capturing natures’ textures and patterns using natural fibres, both her stylised and abstract pieces will lure you into a tactile experience. The hangings are layered with superfine merino wool, high lustre silk, cotton and sustainable threads such as sari silk waste and ethically sourced cocoons.

Hanna’s inspiration is drawn from beach combing, rock pools and the whimsy of lichens and mosses that are observed, thoughtfully collected, and treasured while taking walks with her family around the East Coast of Tasmania. Forest colours are highlighted and reflected throughout the exhibition.

Duncan Meerding

Through his work Duncan aims to explore simplistic forms and the way light performs around them. Whether that is the silhouette cast by the furniture piece itself, or the light cast from within. The form of each item is as important as the light cast on the surrounding surface – be it the shards of light bursting from the varying Cracked Log designs or the light patterns cast from the propellers on the ceiling and the walls.

Duncan’s work is influenced by the natural environment. Utilising sustainable, durable materials is at the core of his design process.

“Sustainability and a focus on the environment are present in every step of our process. The majority of timber is sourced either from waste materials or else from faster growing robust timber varieties. Marrying traditional, hand-made techniques with modern manufacturing technologies, small-scale production ensures that each object is built to last. All items are designed and produced in Tasmania, keeping in mind sustainability and social responsibility through out the whole process.”

Wild Island supports ethical and sustainable use of Tasmanian timbers.

Interwoven – Exhibition by Trauti Reynolds

“With this exhibition I want to celebrate the beauty of Tasmania’s natural world. When walking in the bush with our small sons I learned to look at the often unobtrusive, small details of Tasmania’s forests, mountains and shorelines. Textures, colours and patterns catch my attention and imagination. I hope that this body of work reflects this.”

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Opening 6pm, Friday 1 April
Exhibition continues until Wednesday 27 April

Trauti Reynolds Wet Eucalypt Bark (detail), 36.5x35cm, tapestry weaving with cotton threads, 2015

Passages – Exhibition by Cate Blackmore

Passage: a journey by sea or air; a privilege of conveyance as a passenger.

European history records Abel Tasman’s expedition of 1642, seeking the Great South Land. From that point in time, how many men, women and children have had passage along Tasmania’s coast; seen the granite, the sandstone and the dolerite from the sea, looking in. How many convicts, settlers, officers, merchants and now tourists have gazed upon the painted rocks, the luscious turquoise water and pristine white sand of land’s edge. How welcome was landfall…

(A tribute to the many passengers seeking to find a home in Australia.)

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Amongst The Undergrowth – Exhibition by Jenny Burnett

Spending time alone and drawing trees in the landscapes that gave rise to them – be it the Victorian Mallee or the highlands of Tasmania – allows me to concentrate on not just the beauty of the Australian bush, but also on what is often overlooked: the layers of chaos ( and order ) and the lives that are lived there. This is what I care about and what enriches my life.

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